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Sunday, 12 May 2013

Phrasal Verbs in English

abandon yourself to sth phrasal verb [ R ] to allow yourself to be controlled completely by a feeling or way of living He abandoned himself to his emotions.

abide by sth phrasal verb to accept or obey an agreement, decision or rule Competitors must abide by the judge's decision.


abound in/with sth phrasal verb If something abounds in/with other things, it has a lot of them The coast here abounds with rare plants.

accede to sth phrasal verb FORMAL 1. to agree to do what people have asked you to do He graciously acceded to our request. It is doubtful whether the government will ever accede to the nationalists' demands for independence.

accord with sth phrasal verb to be the same as something, or to agree with something His version of events does not accord with witnesses' statements. account (to sb ) for sth phrasal verb to explain the reason for something or the cause of something Can you account for your absence last Friday? She was unable to account for over $5 000 (= she could not explain where the money was) . He has to account to his manager for (= tell his manager about and explain) all his movements. account for sth phrasal verb to form the total of something Students account for the vast majority of our customers. accustom yourself to sth phrasal verb [ R ] to make yourself familiar with new conditions It'll take time for me to accustom myself to the changes. ache for sth phrasal verb LITERARY to want something very much He was lonely and aching for love. acquaint sb with sth phrasal verb FORMAL to make someone or yourself familiar with something [ R ] Take time to acquaint yourself with the rules. The Broadcasting Museum also offers Saturday workshops to acquaint children with the world of radio. act as sth phrasal verb 1. to do a particular job, especially one that you do not normally do He was asked to act as an advisor on the project. act as sth phrasal verb 2. to have a particular effect Some people say that capital punishment acts as a deterrent. act sth out phrasal verb [ M ] 1. to perform the actions and say the words of a situation or story The children acted out their favourite poem. act sth out phrasal verb [ M ] 2. to express your thoughts, emotions or ideas in your actions Children's negative feelings often get acted out in bad behaviour. act up phrasal verb 1. If a person, especially a child, acts up, they behave badly Sophie got bored and started acting up. act up phrasal verb 2. If a machine or part of the body acts up, it does not perform as well as it should My car always acts up in cold weather. Her shoulder was acting up (= hurting because of injury) . add (sth) up phrasal verb [ M ] to calculate the total of two or more numbers If you add those four figures up, it comes to over £500. She added the bill up. I'm not very good at adding up! add up to sth phrasal verb AMOUNT 1. to become a particular amount The various building programmes add up to several thousand new homes. We thought we'd bought lots of food, but it didn't add up to much when we'd spread it out on the table. add up to sth phrasal verb RESULT 2. to have a particular result or effect It all added up to a lot of hard work for all of us. Their proposals do not add up to any real help for the poor. adhere to sth phrasal verb to continue to obey a rule or have a belief She adhered to her principles/ideals throughout her life. They failed to adhere to the terms of the agreement/treaty. The translator has obviously adhered very strictly to the original text. adjourn to somewhere phrasal verb HUMOROUS to finish doing something and go somewhere, usually for a drink and some food Shall we adjourn to the sitting room for coffee? admit of sth phrasal verb FORMAL to allow something or make it possible The present schedule does not admit of modification (= it cannot be changed) . The latest events admit of several interpretations. agonize over/about sth phrasal verb If you agonize over/about something, you spend time worrying and trying to make a decision about it She agonized for days about whether she should take the job. agree to sth phrasal verb to agree something Both sides in the conflict have agreed to the terms of the peace treaty. agree with sth phrasal verb [ usually in negatives ] to think that something is morally acceptable I don't agree with hunting. agree with sb phrasal verb If a situation or new conditions agree with you, they make you feel healthy and happy You look well - the mountain air must agree with you. aim at sth phrasal verb to plan, hope or intend to achieve something The talks are aiming at a compromise. [ + -ing verb ] The government's campaign is aimed at influenc ing public opinion. aim sth at sb phrasal verb [ usually passive ] If information is aimed at a particular person or group of people, it is made known in a way that influences them or makes them interested in something These advertisements are specifically aimed at young people. align yourself with sb/sth phrasal verb [ R ] If you align yourself with an organization or person, you agree with and support their aims The party is under pressure to align itself more closely with industry. The major unions are aligned with the government on this issue. allow for sth phrasal verb to consider something when you are planning something We allowed for living expenses of £20 a day. [ + -ing verb ] You should allow for the plane be ing delayed. We have to allow for the possibility that we might not finish on schedule. allow of sth phrasal verb FORMAL If a rule or situation allows of something, it makes it possible This rule allows of no exceptions. The evidence allows of only one interpretation - he was murdered by his wife. allude to sb/sth phrasal verb FORMAL to mention someone or something without talking about them directly She mentioned some trouble that she'd had at home and I guessed she was alluding to her son. ally yourself to/with sb phrasal verb [ R ] to join someone and support them He allied himself with the left of the party. amount to sth phrasal verb [ not continuous ] ADD UP TO 1. to become a particular amount The annual cost of income support to unmarried mothers amounted to £700 million in that year. amount to sth phrasal verb [ not continuous ] BE 2. to be the same as something, or to have the same effect as something His behaviour amounted to serious professional misconduct. He gave what amounted to an apology on behalf of his company. angle for sth phrasal verb MAINLY DISAPPROVING If someone is angling for something, they are trying to get something without asking for it directly He's clearly angling for a job/an invitation. answer (sb) back phrasal verb to speak rudely when answering someone in authority Don't you dare answer me back, young lady! answer back phrasal verb to react to criticism by arguing or explaining The company criticized in the documentary was given the opportunity to answer back. answer for sth phrasal verb to be responsible for something bad, or to be punished for something I expect parents to answer for their children's behaviour. "Why do you think there's so much violence nowadays?" "Well, violence on television has a lot to answer for (= is the cause of much of it) ." answer for sb/sth phrasal verb If you say that you can answer for someone or for a quality that they have, you mean that you know from experience that they can be trusted, or that they have that quality I can certainly answer for her professionalism, and whole-heartedly recommend her to any employer. answer to sb phrasal verb to take orders from, obey and explain your actions to someone The great thing about working for yourself is that you don't have to answer to anyone. ante up (sth) phrasal verb US INFORMAL to give money, often unwillingly At least 200 people have been persuaded to ante up big money for the charity event. appear for sb phrasal verb If a lawyer appears for someone, he or she acts for and represents the person Ms Hawley was appearing for the defence. appertain to sth phrasal verb FORMAL to be connected to or belong to She enjoyed the privileges appertaining to the office of chairman. arrive at sth phrasal verb to reach an agreement about something We all argued about it for hours and eventually arrived at a decision. arse about/around phrasal verb UK OFFENSIVE to act in a silly way or waste time I wish he'd stop arsing around and actually do some work. ascribe sth to sth phrasal verb FORMAL to believe or say that something is caused by something else To what do you ascribe your phenomenal success? ascribe sth to sb phrasal verb FORMAL to believe that something was said, written or created by a particular person After years of research, scholars have finally ascribed this anonymous play to Christopher Marlowe. ascribe sth to sb/sth phrasal verb FORMAL to believe that someone or something has a particular quality People like to ascribe human feelings to animals. ask after sb phrasal verb UK ( US ask about , SCOTTISH ask for ) to ask for information about someone, especially about their health Tell your father I was asking after him. ask after sb phrasal verb UK ( US ask about , SCOTTISH ask for ) to ask for information about someone, especially about their health Tell your father I was asking after him. ask after sb phrasal verb UK ( US ask about , SCOTTISH ask for ) to ask for information about someone, especially about their health Tell your father I was asking after him. ask around phrasal verb to ask a lot of different people in order to get information or help Our babysitter's just moved away, so we're asking around for a replacement. ask for sb phrasal verb to say that you would like to see or speak to someone A young man was here asking for you this morning. ask for sth phrasal verb If you say you couldn't ask for someone or something better, you mean that that person or thing is the best of their kind She's great to work for - I really couldn't ask for a better boss. ask sb in phrasal verb [ M ] to invite someone to come into a building or room, especially your home I'd ask you in for a coffee but I have to get up early for work in the morning. ask sb out phrasal verb [ M ] to invite someone to come with you to a place such as the cinema or a restaurant, especially as a way of starting a romantic relationship She's asked Steve out to the cinema this evening. You should ask her out sometime. aspire to sth phrasal verb to have a strong want or hope to do or have something Few people who aspire to fame ever achieve it. [ + to infinitive ] As a child, he aspired to be a great writer. assign sb to sth phrasal verb [ often passive ] to choose someone to do a particular job Which police officer has been assigned to this case? associate sth with sth phrasal verb If problems or dangers are associated with a particular thing or action, they are caused by it The cancer risks associated with smoking have been well documented. associate with sb phrasal verb to spend time with a group of people, especially people who are disapproved of I don't want my children associating with drug-addicts and alcoholics. atone for sth phrasal verb FORMAL to do something that shows that you are sorry for something bad that you did The country's leader has expressed a wish to atone for his actions in the past. attach sth to sth phrasal verb SLIGHTLY FORMAL To attach a particular quality to something is to consider it to have that quality I don't attach any importance/significance to these rumours. She attaches great value to being financially independent. attach to sb/sth phrasal verb MAINLY UK FORMAL If you say that a particular quality attaches to someone or something, you mean that they have that quality Don't worry - it was an accident and no blame attaches to either of you. [ + -ing verb ] Great honour attaches to winn ing this award. attach yourself to sb/sth phrasal verb [ R ] If you attach yourself to a person or group, you join them, usually for a limited period of time Being on his own, he attached himself to a noisy group at the bar. attend to sb/sth phrasal verb to deal with something or help someone Doctors tried to attend to the worst injured soldiers first. I always have so many things to attend to when I come into the office after a trip abroad. attribute sth to sb phrasal verb to think that someone or something has a particular quality or feature I wouldn't dream of attributing such a lack of judgment to you. attribute sth to sb/sth phrasal verb to say or think that something is the result or work of something or someone else The doctors have attributed the cause of the illness to an unknown virus. To what do you attribute this delay? Most experts have attributed the drawing to Michelangelo. avail yourself of sth phrasal verb [ R ] FORMAL to use something to your advantage or good Employees should avail themselves of the opportunity to buy cheap shares in the company. average sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to calculate the average of a set of numbers or amounts If I average out what I earn a month, it's about one and a half thousand pounds. average out phrasal verb to be or become equal in amount or number The highs and lows of life tend to average out in the end. average out at sth phrasal verb to have a particular number or amount as the average My annual holiday varies, but it averages out at five weeks a year. awaken (sth) in sb phrasal verb If a wish, interest or emotion awakens or is awakened in you, you notice it for the first time My holiday in Paris awakened a passion for French food in me. awaken sb to sth phrasal verb If you awaken someone to something, you make them notice it or make them remember it I awakened him to his responsibilities for his children. back away phrasal verb 1. to move backwards away from something or someone, usually because you are frightened She saw that he had a gun and backed away. back away phrasal verb 2. to show that you do not support a plan or idea any more and do not want to be involved with it The government has backed away from plans to increase taxes. back down phrasal verb to admit that you were wrong or that you have been defeated Eventually, Roberto backed down and apologized. Local residents have forced the local council to back down from/on its plans to build a nightclub in their street. back off phrasal verb INFORMAL 1. to stop being involved in a situation, usually in order to allow other people to deal with it themselves She started to criticize me, then she suddenly backed off. Just back off and let us do this on our own, will you? back off phrasal verb INFORMAL 2. to move backwards away from someone, usually because you are frightened I saw the knife and backed off. back onto sth phrasal verb If a building backs onto something, its back faces that thing The house backs onto a narrow alley. back out phrasal verb to decide not to do something that you had said you would do You agreed to come. You can't back out now! They backed out of the deal the day before they were due to sign the contract. back sb up phrasal verb [ M ] 1. to support or help someone My family backed me up throughout the court case. back sb up phrasal verb [ M ] 2. to say that someone is telling the truth Honestly, that's exactly what happened - Claire will back me up. Will you back me up if I say that I never saw him? back sth up phrasal verb [ M often passive ] 1. to prove something is true His claims are backed up by recent research. back sth up phrasal verb [ M often passive ] 2. to make an extra copy of computer information Make sure you back up your files. back (sth) up phrasal verb [ M ] to drive backwards back up phrasal verb If traffic backs up, the vehicles have to wait in a long line because there are too many of them The traffic is starting to back up on the M25. bail out , UK ALSO bale out phrasal verb JUMP 1. to jump out of an aircraft with a parachute because the aircraft is going to have an accident The plane's engine failed and the pilot was forced to bail out. bail out , UK ALSO bale out phrasal verb JUMP 1. to jump out of an aircraft with a parachute because the aircraft is going to have an accident The plane's engine failed and the pilot was forced to bail out. bail out , UK ALSO bale out phrasal verb STOP 2. MAINLY US to stop doing or being involved with something The actor has bailed out of the film after only three weeks' shooting. bail out , UK ALSO bale out phrasal verb STOP 2. MAINLY US to stop doing or being involved with something The actor has bailed out of the film after only three weeks' shooting. bail sth out , UK ALSO bale sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to remove water from the bottom of a boat bail sth out , UK ALSO bale sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to remove water from the bottom of a boat bail sb/sth out , UK ALSO bale sb out phrasal verb [ M ] to help a person or organization that is in difficulty, usually by giving or lending them money She keeps running up huge debts and asking friends to bail her out. bail sb/sth out , UK ALSO bale sb out phrasal verb [ M ] to help a person or organization that is in difficulty, usually by giving or lending them money She keeps running up huge debts and asking friends to bail her out. bail sb out phrasal verb [ M ] to pay money to a court so that someone can be released from prison until their trial balance sth against sth phrasal verb to compare the advantages and disadvantages of something The ecological effects of the factory need to be balanced against the employment it generates. balance (sth) out/up phrasal verb [ M ] to be equal in amount or value, or to make things equal in amount or value We'd better ask a few men to the party to balance up the numbers. I spend a lot one month and not so much the next and in the end it balances out. bale out phrasal verb UK FOR bail out balls (sth) up phrasal verb [ M ] UK OFFENSIVE to spoil something by making a mistake or doing something stupid Trust me to balls up the interview! band together phrasal verb to join together as a group in order to be able to do something better We decided to band together and organize a protest. ˌ bandy sth a ˈ bout/a ˈ round phrasal verb [ M ] to mention something often, without considering it carefully Large figures were bandied about, but no money was ever paid. bang on phrasal verb INFORMAL DISAPPROVING to talk about something for a long time, especially in a way that is boring to other people My parents are always banging on about how much better life was 20 years ago. bang sb up phrasal verb [ M ] SLANG to lock someone up, especially in prison She's terrified of him and won't make a statement until we've got him banged up in the cells. bank on sb/sth phrasal verb to expect something or depend on something happening Can I bank on your support? [ + -ing verb ] I wouldn't bank on him be ing there. "Do you think she'll come?" "I wouldn't bank on it ". I'd banked on gett ing a pay rise this year. bargain sth away phrasal verb to exchange something good for something of less value I realized that by trying to gain security I had bargained away my freedom. bargain for/on sth phrasal verb to expect or be prepared for something We hadn't bargained on such a long wait. The strength of the opposition was rather more than she'd bargained for . barge in/into sth phrasal verb INFORMAL to walk into a room quickly, without being invited I wish he'd knock instead of just barging in. barge in phrasal verb INFORMAL to interrupt rudely Sorry to barge in, but I couldn't help overhearing what you were saying. barrack for sb phrasal verb AUSTRALIAN to shout encouragement to the players in a football team base sth on sth phrasal verb If you base something on facts or ideas, you use those facts or ideas to develop it The film is based on a short story by Thomas Mann. bash on phrasal verb UK INFORMAL to continue doing something that is difficult, boring or takes a long time Oh well, that's enough chatting. I suppose I'd better bash on with this essay. bask in sth phrasal verb to take pleasure from something that makes you feel good He basked in his moment of glory, holding the trophy up to the crowd. batten on sb phrasal verb LITERARY to live well by using someone else's money He's spent these last five years battening on a rich aunt of his. bawl sb out phrasal verb [ M ] US INFORMAL to tell someone angrily that something they have done is wrong He's always bawling out people in meetings. be in for sth phrasal verb to be going to experience something unpleasant very soon The weather forecast says we're in for heavy rain this evening. You'll be in for it (= She will be very angry) if you don't do what she tells you. bear down on sb/sth phrasal verb to move in a threatening way towards someone or something I looked up to see the car bearing down on me bear in on/upon phrasal verb UK FORMAL If something is borne in on/upon someone, they are made to understand it Suddenly it was borne in on him that he was becoming too old to start a new career. bear on sth phrasal verb SLIGHTLY FORMAL to be connected or related to; to influence I don't see how that information bears on this case. bear sb/sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to support the truth of something His version of events just isn't borne out by the facts. If you tell them what happened I will bear you out ( on it). bear up phrasal verb to deal with a very sad or difficult situation in a brave and determined way "How has she been since the funeral?" "Oh, she's bearing up." bear with sb phrasal verb to be patient and wait while someone does something If you'll just bear with me for a moment , I'll find you a copy of the drawings. beat sth/sb back phrasal verb [ M ] If you beat back someone or something dangerous, you use force to move them away from you Riot police beat back the crowds of demonstrators. beat down phrasal verb If the sun beats down, it shines very strongly and makes the air very hot The tropical sun beat down on them mercilessly. beat sb down phrasal verb [ M ] INFORMAL to persuade someone to accept a lower amount of money for something He wanted £50 for the bike, but I managed to beat him down to £35. beat sb off phrasal verb [ M ] to manage to defeat someone who is attacking you She beat off her attacker by hitting him with her handbag. FIGURATIVE The company managed to beat off the competition and secure the contract. beat off phrasal verb US OFFENSIVE to masturbate beat sth out phrasal verb [ M ] MUSIC 1. to make sounds that have a particular rhythm by hitting something such as a drum The drummer beat out a steady rhythm while we marched. beat sth out phrasal verb [ M ] FIRE 2. to make a fire go out by hitting it repeatedly with an object, such as a large piece of cloth She beat the flames out with her bare hands. beat sb out phrasal verb [ M ] MAINLY US to defeat someone or do better than them in a competition, sport or business They beat out several other rivals for the contract. beat sth out of sb phrasal verb to make someone say things they do not want to by hitting them The men claimed that the police had beaten the confession out of them. beat sb up phrasal verb [ M ] INFORMAL to hurt someone badly by hitting or kicking them again and again He claims he was beaten up by the police. beaver away phrasal verb INFORMAL to work hard for a long time She has been beavering away at that essay for hours. become of sb/sth phrasal verb [ not continuous ] If you ask what became of someone or something, you want to know where they are and what happened to them Whatever became of that parcel you sent? And Mickey Adams - I wonder what became of him. bed down phrasal verb SLEEP 1. to lie down somewhere, usually somewhere different from where you usually sleep, in order to go to sleep I bedded down on the couch for the night. bed down phrasal verb WORK WELL 2. If a new process or organization beds down, it starts to operate well because it has existed for long enough It did not take the procedure long to bed down. bed sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to move young or delicate plants from inside and plant them outside May is the time to bed out the geraniums. beef sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to make something stronger or more important We need to find some new players to beef up the team. The company has plans to beef up its production. Your report on the new car park is fine, but why don't you beef it up a bit with some figures? beg off phrasal verb to ask to be allowed not to do something that you are expected to do She begged off early from the party because she was so tired. believe in sth phrasal verb 1. to be certain that something exists Do you believe in ghosts? believe in sth phrasal verb 2. to be confident that something is effective and right They don't believe in living together before marriage. He believes in saying what he thinks. believe in sb phrasal verb to trust someone because you think that they can do something well or that they are a good person [ R ] Gradually, since her divorce, she's beginning to believe in herself again. belong to sb phrasal verb to be someone's property This book belongs to Sarah. You shouldn't take what doesn't belong to you. belong to sth phrasal verb to be a member of a group or organization They belong to the same chess club. belt sth out phrasal verb [ M ] INFORMAL to sing or play a musical instrument very loudly The band was belting out all the old favourites. belt up phrasal verb BE QUIET 1. UK VERY INFORMAL used to tell someone to stop talking or making a noise Just belt up, will you! I'm trying to concentrate. belt up phrasal verb FASTEN 2. UK INFORMAL ( US buckle up ) to fasten the belt that keeps you in your seat in a car or a plane Don't forget, belt up before you drive off. belt up phrasal verb FASTEN 2. UK INFORMAL ( US buckle up ) to fasten the belt that keeps you in your seat in a car or a plane Don't forget, belt up before you drive off. big sb/sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to talk a lot about how excellent someone or something is, sometimes praising them or it more than is deserved bill sb as sth phrasal verb [ usually passive ] to describe someone in a particular way in order to advertise them The young author was billed as 'the new Beckett'. bind sb to sth phrasal verb [ usually passive ] to force someone to keep a promise His sister had been bound to secrecy . We are bound to the original contract. bite sth back phrasal verb [ M ] UK to stop yourself from saying something or from expressing an emotion bite back tears/laughter bite into sth phrasal verb to reduce something valuable People are worried about inflation biting into their savings and investments. black sth out phrasal verb [ M ] COVER 1. to cover a face or a name so that it cannot be seen In the TV interview, they blacked out the victim's face. black sth out phrasal verb [ M ] NO LIGHT 2. to make a place dark, especially by covering or switching off all the lights The entire city was blacked out overnight. black out phrasal verb to become unconscious suddenly but for a short period blank sth out phrasal verb [ M ] COVER 1. to intentionally cover over something that is written so that it cannot be read Some of the names in the report have been blanked out. blank sth out phrasal verb [ M ] FORGET 2. to stop yourself thinking about a memory because it is unpleasant and you would prefer not to remember it There may be traumatic incident in your past that you have blanked out. blast off phrasal verb If a rocket blasts off, it leaves the ground to go into space. blend in/blend into sth phrasal verb to look or seem the same as surrounding people or things and therefore not be easily noticeable We tried to blend into the crowd. They have adopted local customs and tried to blend in with the community. bliss (sb) out phrasal verb INFORMAL to become, or to make someone, completely happy and relaxed to bliss out on music/LSD I like to go off on my own - to sit back and bliss out in a darkened movie theater. block sth in phrasal verb [ M ] to put a vehicle so close to another vehicle that it cannot drive away Another car had parked behind me and blocked me in. block sth off phrasal verb [ M ] to close a road, path or entrance so that people cannot use it All the roads out of the town had been blocked off by the police. block sth out phrasal verb [ M ] STOP FROM PASSING 1. to stop light or noise from passing through something The tree outside the window blocks out the sun. block sth out phrasal verb [ M ] STOP FROM THINKING 2. to stop yourself from thinking about an unpleasant memory because it upsets you He's trying to block out memories of the accident. block sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to fill a narrow space with something so that nothing can pass through In autumn, leaves block the drains up. blot sth out phrasal verb [ M ] SUN 1. to hide or block the light from something, especially the sun A dark cloud suddenly blotted out the sun. blot sth out phrasal verb [ M ] MEMORY 2. to stop yourself, or to prevent you, thinking about something unpleasant Perhaps there are some memories so bad that you have to blot them out. blow sb away phrasal verb PLEASE 1. MAINLY US INFORMAL to surprise or please someone very much The ending will blow you away. blow sb away phrasal verb KILL 2. [ M ] US INFORMAL to kill a person by shooting them blow sb/sth away phrasal verb [ M ] US INFORMAL to defeat someone or something completely, especially in a sports competition They blew the other team away in the second half of the game. ˌ blow sth/sb ˈ off phrasal verb [ M ] US to treat something or someone as if they are not important Just blow off his comments, he's only joking. blow (sth) out phrasal verb [ M ] If a flame blows out or you blow it out, it stops burning when a person or the wind blows on it After dinner she blew out the candles. The sudden breeze made the candles blow out. blow sb out phrasal verb [ M ] INFORMAL to disappoint someone by not meeting them or not doing something that you had arranged to do with them She was supposed to go to that party with me, but she blew me out. blow over phrasal verb SITUATION 1. When an argument blows over, it becomes gradually less important until it ends and is forgotten I thought that after a few days the argument would blow over. blow over phrasal verb STORM 2. When a storm blows over, it becomes gradually less strong until it ends The storm raged all night but by morning it had blown over. blow (sb/sth) up phrasal verb [ M ] to destroy something or kill someone with a bomb, or to be destroyed or killed by a bomb They threatened to blow up the plane if their demands were not met. He drove over a landmine and his jeep blew up. blow sth up phrasal verb [ M ] FILL WITH AIR 1. to fill something with air Would you help me blow up these balloons? blow sth up phrasal verb [ M ] PHOTO 2. to print a photograph or picture in a larger size blow up phrasal verb STORM 1. When a storm blows up, it begins. blow up phrasal verb ANGER 2. INFORMAL to suddenly become very angry My dad blew up ( at me) when he saw the phone bill. blurt sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to say something suddenly and without thinking, usually because you are excited or nervous He blurted everything out about the baby, though we'd agreed to keep it a secret for a while. [ + speech ] She suddenly blurted out, "I can't do it". [ + that ] Late one evening, Gianni blurted out that he loved her. board sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to cover a door or window with wooden boards Shopkeepers are boarding up their windows in case rioting breaks out. be/get bogged down phrasal verb to be/become so involved in something difficult or complicated that you cannot do anything else Let's not get bogged down with individual complaints UK Try not to get too bogged down in the details. bog off phrasal verb UK SLANG to go away Bog off and leave me alone. boil away phrasal verb When a liquid boils away, it all turns into a gas so that none of it is left in liquid form. boil (sth) down phrasal verb [ M ] to heat a liquid or food so that part of it is turned into gas and its amount is reduced ˌ boil sth ˈ down phrasal verb [ M ] to reduce information, usually so that it contains only its most important parts He had boiled down a lengthy report to just a few paragraphs. boil down to sth phrasal verb If a situation or problem boils down to something, that is the main reason for it The problem boils down to one thing - lack of money. boil over phrasal verb PERSON 1. If a difficult situation or negative emotion boils over, it cannot be controlled any more and people start to argue or fight. boil over phrasal verb LIQUID 2. If a liquid that is being heated boils over, it rises up and flows over the edge of the pan Take the milk off the heat before it boils over. boil over phrasal verb LIQUID 3. If a pan boils over, the liquid in it rises up and flows over the edge That saucepan is boiling over. boil up phrasal verb If a bad emotion boils up, it becomes very strong and difficult to control Anger suddenly boiled up in him. boil sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to heat up liquid or food in a pan until it boils Could you boil some water up for me? bollocks sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to spoil something by making mistakes They completely bollocksed up the game. Try not to bollocks it up this time! bolt sth on phrasal verb to add an extra part or feature Other insurers will allow you to bolt on critical illness cover to standard life cover. bombard sb with sth phrasal verb to direct so many things at someone, especially to ask them so many questions, that they find it difficult to deal with them The children bombarded her with questions. bone up phrasal verb INFORMAL to learn as much as you can about something for a special reason She boned up on economics before applying for the job. book in/book into somewhere phrasal verb UK to say that you have arrived and sign an official book when you get to a hotel After booking into our hotel, we went straight down to the beach. As soon as she arrived in Tokyo, she booked in at her hotel. book sb in/book sb into sth phrasal verb MAINLY UK to arrange for someone to stay at a hotel They've booked us into the hotel in the main square. I've booked you in at the Savoy. book sb in/book sb into sth phrasal verb MAINLY UK to arrange for someone to stay at a hotel They've booked us into the hotel in the main square. I've booked you in at the Savoy. border on sth phrasal verb If behaviour, a quality or a feeling borders on something more extreme, it is almost that thing His suggestion borders on the ridiculous. She possesses a self-confidence that borders on arrogance. bore into sb phrasal verb If someone's eyes bore into you, they look at you very hard and make you feel nervous. bottle out phrasal verb UK SLANG to suddenly decide not to do something because you feel frightened and lose your confidence I was going to enter a belly-dancing contest, but I bottled out at the last minute. bottle sth up phrasal verb [ M ] When a person bottles things up, they refuse to talk about things that make them angry or worried. bottom out phrasal verb to have reached the lowest point in a continuously changing situation and to be about to improve The government claims that the recession is bottoming out. bounce back phrasal verb to start to be successful again after a difficult period, for example after experiencing failure, loss of confidence, illness or unhappiness Stock prices bounced back after a steep plunge earlier this week. Children often seem to bounce back from illness more quickly than adults do. bounce sb into sth phrasal verb UK to force somebody to do something that they do not want to do, usually relating to politics [ + -ing verb ] The opposition hopes to bounce the Prime Minister into call ing an early election. bounce sth off sb phrasal verb If you bounce something off someone, you tell someone about an idea or plan in order to find out what they think of it Can I bounce a couple of ideas off you? bow down to sb phrasal verb MAINLY UK to agree to obey someone He expects me to bow down to him and do everything he tells me. bow out phrasal verb to leave a job or stop doing an activity, usually after a long time She'll be bowing out at the end of the month, after presenting the programme for eight years. bow to sb/sth phrasal verb to do what someone else wants you to do, usually unwillingly Eventually the government was forced to bow to public pressure and reform the tax. bowl down/along sth phrasal verb to go quickly They bowled down the street on their new bicycles. bowl sb out phrasal verb [ M ] in the game of cricket, to make someone have to leave the cricket field by hitting the wicket (= three vertical sticks) behind them with the ball bowl sb over phrasal verb [ usually passive ] KNOCK DOWN 1. to knock someone to the ground by running into them She was almost bowled over by a huge dog. bowl sb over phrasal verb [ usually passive ] PLEASE 2. to surprise and please someone a lot She was bowled over when she heard she'd won the competition. book sb in/book sb into sth phrasal verb MAINLY UK to arrange for someone to stay at a hotel They've booked us into the hotel in the main square. I've booked you in at the Savoy. border on sth phrasal verb If behaviour, a quality or a feeling borders on something more extreme, it is almost that thing His suggestion borders on the ridiculous. She possesses a self-confidence that borders on arrogance. bore into sb phrasal verb If someone's eyes bore into you, they look at you very hard and make you feel nervous. bottle out phrasal verb UK SLANG to suddenly decide not to do something because you feel frightened and lose your confidence I was going to enter a belly-dancing contest, but I bottled out at the last minute. bottle sth up phrasal verb [ M ] When a person bottles things up, they refuse to talk about things that make them angry or worried. bottom out phrasal verb to have reached the lowest point in a continuously changing situation and to be about to improve The government claims that the recession is bottoming out. bounce back phrasal verb to start to be successful again after a difficult period, for example after experiencing failure, loss of confidence, illness or unhappiness Stock prices bounced back after a steep plunge earlier this week. Children often seem to bounce back from illness more quickly than adults do. bounce sb into sth phrasal verb UK to force somebody to do something that they do not want to do, usually relating to politics [ + -ing verb ] The opposition hopes to bounce the Prime Minister into call ing an early election. bounce sth off sb phrasal verb If you bounce something off someone, you tell someone about an idea or plan in order to find out what they think of it Can I bounce a couple of ideas off you? bow down to sb phrasal verb MAINLY UK to agree to obey someone He expects me to bow down to him and do everything he tells me. bow out phrasal verb to leave a job or stop doing an activity, usually after a long time She'll be bowing out at the end of the month, after presenting the programme for eight years. bow to sb/sth phrasal verb to do what someone else wants you to do, usually unwillingly Eventually the government was forced to bow to public pressure and reform the tax. bowl down/along sth phrasal verb to go quickly They bowled down the street on their new bicycles. bowl sb out phrasal verb [ M ] in the game of cricket, to make someone have to leave the cricket field by hitting the wicket (= three vertical sticks) behind them with the ball bowl sb over phrasal verb [ usually passive ] KNOCK DOWN 1. to knock someone to the ground by running into them She was almost bowled over by a huge dog. bowl sb over phrasal verb [ usually passive ] PLEASE 2. to surprise and please someone a lot She was bowled over when she heard she'd won the competition. box sb/sth in phrasal verb [ M often passive ] to move so close to someone or something that they cannot move away When I got back to my car, I found it had been boxed in by a lorry. box sb in phrasal verb [ M often passive ] to prevent someone from doing what they want to do She did not want to send her son to a school where he would be boxed in by so many rules and regulations. branch off phrasal verb If a road or path branches off, it goes in another direction We drove down a narrow track that branched off from the main road. ˌ branch off sth phrasal verb to leave a main road by turning into a smaller road We branched off the main route and went through the countryside. branch out phrasal verb to start to do something different from what you usually do, especially in your job This designer has recently branched out into children's wear. After a couple of years working for other people, she branched out on her own (= started her own business) . brazen sth out phrasal verb [ M ] to act confidently and not admit that a problem exists I decided to brazen it out and hoped they wouldn't notice the scratch on the car. break away phrasal verb ESCAPE 1. to leave or to escape from someone who is holding you He grabbed her, but she managed to break away. FIGURATIVE One or two of the tourists broke away from the tour group. break away phrasal verb NOT AGREE 2. to stop being part of a group because you begin to disagree with them In the early 1980s some members of the British Labour Party broke away to form the Social Democratic Party. break down phrasal verb MACHINE 1. If a machine or vehicle breaks down, it stops working Our car broke down and we had to push it off the road. break down phrasal verb COMMUNICATION 2. If a system, relationship or discussion breaks down, it fails because there is a problem or disagreement. break down phrasal verb CRY 3. to be unable to control your feelings and to start to cry When we gave her the bad news, she broke down and cried. break sb in phrasal verb [ M ] If you break someone in, you train them to do a new job or activity The boss did not believe in breaking his staff in gently . break sth in phrasal verb [ M ] 1. to wear new shoes or use new equipment for short periods to make them more comfortable My new hiking boots will be great once I've broken them in. break sth in phrasal verb [ M ] 2. US FOR run sth in break in/break into sth phrasal verb to get into a building or car using force, usually to steal something The burglars broke in through the kitchen window. My car's been broken into twice this month. break in phrasal verb to interrupt when someone else is talking As she was talking, he suddenly broke in, saying, "That's a lie". break into sth phrasal verb to suddenly begin to do something He felt so happy that he broke into song (= suddenly began to sing) . She walked quickly, occasionally breaking into a run (= starting to run) . break sth off phrasal verb [ M ] SEPARATE 1. to separate a part from a larger piece, or to become separate He broke off a piece of chocolate. break sth off phrasal verb [ M ] RELATIONSHIP 2. to end a relationship They've broken off their engagement. The governments have broken off diplomatic relations. break (sth) off phrasal verb to suddenly stop speaking or doing something She broke off in the middle of a sentence. break out phrasal verb START 1. If something dangerous or unpleasant breaks out, it suddenly starts War broke out in 1914. Fighting has broken out all over the city. break out phrasal verb ESCAPE 2. to escape from prison They broke out of prison and fled the country. break through sth phrasal verb to force yourself through something that is holding you back Protesters broke through the barriers. break sth off phrasal verb [ M ] RELATIONSHIP 2. to end a relationship They've broken off their engagement. The governments have broken off diplomatic relations. break (sth) off phrasal verb to suddenly stop speaking or doing something She broke off in the middle of a sentence. break out phrasal verb START 1. If something dangerous or unpleasant breaks out, it suddenly starts War broke out in 1914. Fighting has broken out all over the city. break out phrasal verb ESCAPE 2. to escape from prison They broke out of prison and fled the country. break through sth phrasal verb to force yourself through something that is holding you back Protesters broke through the barriers. break sth up phrasal verb [ M ] to divide into many pieces, or to divide something into many pieces The company has been broken up and sold off. break (sth) up phrasal verb [ M ] If an occasion when people meet breaks up or someone breaks it up, it ends and people start to leave The meeting broke up at ten to three. I don't want to break up the party but I have to go now. break up phrasal verb END RELATIONSHIP 1. If a marriage breaks up or two people in a romantic relationship break up, their marriage or their relationship ends Jenny and George have broken up. She's just broken up with her boyfriend. break up phrasal verb STOP CLASSES 2. UK When schools and colleges, or the teachers and students who go to them break up, their classes stop and the holidays start We broke up for the holidays in June. break up phrasal verb STOP BEING HEARD 3. If someone who is talking on a mobile phone is breaking up, their voice can not fully be heard. break with sth phrasal verb to intentionally not continue doing something that is normal, expected or traditional We decided to break with tradition and not spend Christmas with our family. The country's leadership is determined to break with past practices and to solve urgent economic problems. brick up sth phrasal verb [ M ] to build a wall of bricks around something, or to fill something with bricks The doors and windows had been bricked up to prevent squatters from getting in. bring sth about phrasal verb [ M ] to cause something to happen He brought about his company's collapse by his reckless spending. bring sb/sth along phrasal verb MAINLY UK to take someone or something with you Can I bring a friend along to the party? bring sb around phrasal verb [ M ] MAINLY US FOR bring sb round bring sth back phrasal verb [ M ] RETURN 1. to return from somewhere with something [ + two objects ] Can you bring me back some milk? bring sth back phrasal verb [ M ] REMEMBER 2. to make someone think about something from the past The photos brought back some wonderful memories. bring sth back phrasal verb [ M ] DO AGAIN 3. to start to do or use something that was done or used in the past Few politicians are in favour of bringing back the death penalty. bring sb down phrasal verb [ M ] to cause someone in a position of power to lose their job This scandal could bring down the government. bring sth down phrasal verb [ M ] to reduce the level of something They've really brought down the price of DVD players. bring sth forward phrasal verb [ M ] MAINLY UK to change the date or time of an event so that it happens earlier than planned The elections were brought forward by three months. bring sth in phrasal verb [ M ] INTRODUCE 1. to introduce something new such as a product or a law New safety regulations have been brought in. break up phrasal verb STOP BEING HEARD 3. If someone who is talking on a mobile phone is breaking up, their voice can not fully be heard. break with sth phrasal verb to intentionally not continue doing something that is normal, expected or traditional We decided to break with tradition and not spend Christmas with our family. The country's leadership is determined to break with past practices and to solve urgent economic problems. brick up sth phrasal verb [ M ] to build a wall of bricks around something, or to fill something with bricks The doors and windows had been bricked up to prevent squatters from getting in. bring sth about phrasal verb [ M ] to cause something to happen He brought about his company's collapse by his reckless spending. bring sb/sth along phrasal verb MAINLY UK to take someone or something with you Can I bring a friend along to the party? bring sb around phrasal verb [ M ] MAINLY US FOR bring sb round bring sth back phrasal verb [ M ] RETURN 1. to return from somewhere with something [ + two objects ] Can you bring me back some milk? bring sth back phrasal verb [ M ] REMEMBER 2. to make someone think about something from the past The photos brought back some wonderful memories. bring sth back phrasal verb [ M ] DO AGAIN 3. to start to do or use something that was done or used in the past Few politicians are in favour of bringing back the death penalty. bring sb down phrasal verb [ M ] to cause someone in a position of power to lose their job This scandal could bring down the government. bring sth down phrasal verb [ M ] to reduce the level of something They've really brought down the price of DVD players. bring sth forward phrasal verb [ M ] MAINLY UK to change the date or time of an event so that it happens earlier than planned The elections were brought forward by three months. bring sth in phrasal verb [ M ] INTRODUCE 1. to introduce something new such as a product or a law New safety regulations have been brought in. bring sth in phrasal verb [ M ] MONEY 2. to make money Their chain of pubs and restaurants brings in millions of pounds a year. bring sb in phrasal verb [ M ] to ask someone to do a particular job We need to bring in an expert to deal with this problem. bring sth off phrasal verb [ M ] to succeed in doing something difficult It was an important event, and she's managed to bring it off brilliantly. bring sth on phrasal verb [ M ] 1. to make something happen, usually something bad The loud music brought on another one of his headaches. bring sb out phrasal verb [ M ] UK to make a shy person happier and more confident Paulo's very shy - he needs bringing out. bring sth out phrasal verb [ M ] PRODUCE 1. to produce something to sell to the public They keep bringing out smaller phones. bring sth out phrasal verb [ M ] MAKE NOTICEABLE 2. to make a particular quality or detail noticeable A crisis can bring out the best and the worst in people. The seasoning really brings out the flavour of the meat. bring sb out in sth phrasal verb UK If something brings you out in spots, a rash , etc., it causes them to appear on your skin Seafood always brings me out in huge spots. bring sth off phrasal verb [ M ] to succeed in doing something difficult It was an important event, and she's managed to bring it off brilliantly. bring sth on phrasal verb [ M ] 1. to make something happen, usually something bad The loud music brought on another one of his headaches. bring sb round phrasal verb ( US USUALLY bring sb around ) MAKE CONSCIOUS 1. to make someone become conscious again after being unconscious I gave him a sniff of smelling salts to bring him round. bring sb round phrasal verb ( US USUALLY bring sb around ) MAKE CONSCIOUS 1. to make someone become conscious again after being unconscious I gave him a sniff of smelling salts to bring him round. bring sb round phrasal verb ( US USUALLY bring sb around ) PERSUADE 2. to persuade someone to have the same opinion as you have At first they refused but I managed to bring them round ( to my way of thinking). bring sb round phrasal verb ( US USUALLY bring sb around ) PERSUADE 2. to persuade someone to have the same opinion as you have At first they refused but I managed to bring them round ( to my way of thinking). bring sb to phrasal verb to make someone become conscious again after being unconscious He lost consciousness after the fall, and they were unable to bring him to. bring sb/sth together phrasal verb to cause people to be friendly with each other The disaster brought the community together. bring sb up phrasal verb [ M ] to care for a child until it is an adult, often giving it particular beliefs She was brought up by her grandmother. They brought her up (as/to be) a Catholic. [ + to infinitive ] David was brought up to respect authority. bring sth up phrasal verb [ M ] TALK 1. to start to talk about a particular subject She's always bringing up her health problems. bring sth up phrasal verb [ M ] VOMIT 2. UK INFORMAL to vomit something She was crying so much I thought she'd bring up her breakfast. bristle with sth phrasal verb to have a large amount of something, or to be full of something The helicopter hovered above them bristling with machine guns. broaden out phrasal verb to become wider The river broadens out around the next bend. brush sb/sth aside phrasal verb [ M ] to refuse to consider something seriously because you feel that it is not important She brushed their objections aside, saying "Leave it to me." brush sb/sth off phrasal verb [ M ] to remove dust or dirt from someone or something by using your hands or a brush He brushed the snow off his coat. brush sth off phrasal verb [ M ] to refuse to listen to what someone says, or to refuse to think about something seriously He just brushed off all their criticisms. brush past sb phrasal verb to walk quickly past someone, usually because you do not want to speak to them Ignoring their protests, Newman brushed past waiting journalists. brush up on sth phrasal verb to improve your knowledge of something already learned but partly forgotten I thought I'd brush up on my French before going to Paris.

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